NEWS 4 JAX: DeSantis wants to spend $625 million to restore Everglades

NEWS 4 JAX: Written by Ashley Harding. April 16th, 2019.

GAINESVILLE, Fla. - Gov. Ron DeSantis is pushing to allocate hundreds of millions of dollars to restore the Everglades and battle blue-green algae and red tide in South Florida waters. In an announcement Tuesday morning at the University of Florida, DeSantis said he wants to allocate $625 million to the cause next year and $2.5 billion over his four-year term to improve water quality.

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FLORIDA DAILY: Francis Rooney Calls on Army Corps of Engineers to Monitor Toxic Algae

Florida Daily: Written by Kevin Derby. April 15th, 2019.

A Florida congressman is calling on the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to work closely with the state government to monitor toxic algae. At the end of last week, U.S. Rep. Francis Rooney, R-Fla., wrote Lt. Gen. Todd Semonite, the chief of Engineers and commanding general of the orps of Engineers, “requesting federal cooperation with state agencies to monitor the application of glyphosate-based herbicides which can contribute to toxic algae growth.”

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PALM BEACH POST: JUST IN: New water board not happy about sugar lease on reservoir land, but can deal be rewritten?

Palm Beach Post: Written by Kimberly Miller. April 11th, 2019.

A controversial lease approved by the ousted board of the South Florida Water Management District is under “immediate” review as new members look at whether the agreement with agriculture giant Florida Crystals can be renegotiated. The eight-year lease, discussed at a Thursday board meeting, allows farming to continue on 16,000 acres slated for a reservoir south of Lake Okeechobee. The above-ground reservoir is expected to reduce harmful lake discharges to the northern estuaries.

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TC PALM: National wildlife refuge at Hobe Sound to be named for 'Nat' Reed in April 17 ceremony

TC Palm: Written by Tyler Treadway. April 9th, 2019.

The Hobe Sound National Wildlife Refuge officially will be renamed in honor of Nathaniel P. "Nat" Reed, a Martin County environmentalist who helped preserve natural areas in Florida and throughout the United States, in a ceremony April 17. Reed, a longtime resident of Jupiter Island near the refuge, served as assistant secretary of the Interior for Fish and Wildlife and Parks under presidents Richard M. Nixon and Gerald R. Ford.

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TC PALM: Army Corps tells SFWMD board pieces of EEA reservoir construction could begin 'quickly'

TC PALM: Written by Tyler Treadway. April 11th, 2019.

WEST PALM BEACH — Construction of "small pieces" of the long-awaited reservoir to curb damaging Lake Okeechobee discharges could start quickly, the Army Corps of Engineers said Thursday. But major construction will probably start in spring 2020, Col. Andrew Kelly Corps commander for Florida told the South Florida Water Management District board.

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PALM BEACH POST: Lake O drought concerns called ‘inaccurate and misleading’

Palm Beach Post: Written by Kimberly Miller. April 9th, 2019.

Audubon Everglades Policy Director Celeste De Palma said the lake needs to be drained to at least 11 feet periodically to allow for eel grass recovery. Audubon Florida hit back last week at concerns that lowering Lake Okeechobee will dry up water supplies during drought, calling arguments made by cities, including West Palm Beach, inaccurate and misleading.

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WINK NEWS: Rep. Rooney takes on the sugar industry, demanding change to the Corp

WINK News: Written by Brendon Leslie. March 13th, 2019.

Making sure April showers wont bring May algae, Representative Francis Rooney is taking on the sugar industry, hoping that our waterways don’t drown in green gunk again. He says sugar farmers are in large part responsible for the blooms and believes he has the answer to solve the water crisis, “One of the things I’m trying to do is to remove agriculture from the corps mission and focus their mission exclusively on dealing with flood control and water.”

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NEWS PRESS: Florida Department of Health emails show agency struggled to manage algae crisis

NEWS PRESS: Written by Amy Bennet Williams. April 7th, 2019.

With toxic algae fouling Southwest Florida’s inland waterways and coastline last year, state health officials faced a flood of worried questions as people turned to them for crisis leadership. Some were specific: Were Caloosahatchee blue crabs safe to eat? Was it dangerous to breathe near the algae-choked canals? How about swimming in the Gulf?

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HATCH MAG: It's time to stop starving Florida Bay

Hatch Mag: Written by Johnny Carrol Sain. April 3rd, 2019.

"Hey, there's a nurse shark," says Captain Eric Lund. His nonchalant tone doesn't jibe with the words. From my perspective as landlocked for life, a shark sighting is cause for exclamation. The hulking burgundy form shadows the skiff, wig-wagging over turtle grass while I snap photo after photo. And they all suck. Too many shadows, and the shark is just too deep through the jade-shaded crystal water. Auto focus can't capture the fish and I'm too slow on the draw manually.

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NEWS PRESS: Toxins, possible blue-green algae indicator showing up in local water quality samples

News Press. Written by Chad Gillis. April 4th, 2019.

Remember that blue-green algae that ravaged the region last summer? It still hasn't gone away. Not completely. Water quality scientists and environmental groups are worried the seeds could be planted for another crippling bloom, as cyanobacteria is still being found in the Everglades system.

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