SUN SENTINEL: Sugar industry accused of dodging Everglades clean-up costs

SUN SENTINEL: June 15, 2014. Written by Andy Reid.

Florida taxpayers have been left shouldering most of the $2 billion Everglades water pollution cleanup cost, despite a constitutional amendment passed by nearly 70 percent of voters that calls for the sugar industry to pick up its share of the tab.

While South Florida sugar-cane growers excel at providing the sweet ingredient for everything from cakes to candy bars, polluted phosphorus-laden runoff from sugar-cane fields has damaging consequences on the Everglades.

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READ: The Florida Legislature's Amendment 1 Fraud

Published in Tampa Tribune on June 17, 2015: The state budget that Florida lawmakers will vote on Friday amounts to a brazen betrayal of the public's trust. Months after voters overwhelmingly approved spending hundreds of millions in additional money to protect endangered waters and lands, legislators are poised to spend less on the environment than before Amendment 1 was on the ballot. This violates the intent of the voters, who should remember before the next election the name of each lawmaker who supports such a callous disregard for their express wishes.

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READ: Lawmakers, Remember Your Oath

Reported in Sun Sentinel on June 11, 2015:  "A majority of Florida lawmakers bill themselves as fiscally conservative and strict followers of the Constitution, but the ongoing standoff over the purchase of new public lands paints a far different picture."

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BREAKING NEWS: Possible Algal Bloom in Palm City

Toxic_Algae_Palm_City.jpgReported in TC Palm on May 18, 2015: What appears to be a blue-green algae bloom is in a canal behind houses on Mooring Drive. The telltale green slick stretches behind about four backyard docks in the short, dead-end canal, just north of the Old Palm City Bridge. Allen Winchel said he first saw “a trace” of the algae along the dock behind his house Saturday morning. “It started forming into a bloom on Sunday,” Winchel said Monday morning. “Now it’s a lot worse.”

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Memo to Interested Parties

To: Interested Parties
From: Mary Barley, Founder of Everglades Trust
Date: Tuesday, April 21, 2015
Re: Everglades Restoration, U.S. Sugar Land Buy Growing Support
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READ: Everglades land purchase a no-brainer, except in Tallahassee

Published in Tampa Tribune on 4/18/2015:  The state cut a deal with U.S. Sugar seven years ago to pay a fair-market price for 46,800 acres south of Lake Okeechobee that could be used to filter polluted water before it flows to the Everglades. It was a good deal then, and it’s a good deal today.

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READ: Scott's Chance to Fix Florida's Fouled Estuaries

Published in Tampa Bay Times on April 16:  When I came to Florida to fish in 2000, I saw sparkling, blue-green water flooding into its lagoons and estuaries and roseate spoonbills roosting in mangroves. Since then dramatic changes have occurred and, as seasoned guides will tell you, there just aren't as many fish left. What happened in 15 years?

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SUN SENTINEL: Big Sugar building proposal raises Everglades restoration concerns

Sun Sentinel: Written by Andy Reid. September 13, 2014.

Everglades restoration could get torpedoed by a sugar industry push to allow new neighborhoods and shopping centers on 43,000 acres of farmland south of Lake Okeechobee, according to environmental activists.

Dozens of environmental advocacy organizations on Thursday called for Gov. Rick Scott and the South Florida Water Management District to put the brakes on the proposed Sugar Hill development plan for sugar cane fields near Clewiston in Hendry County, not far from Palm Beach County's western boundary.

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