TCPALM: Eve Samples: Economic Council co-founder resigns, citing U.S. Sugar

TCPalm: Written by Eve Samples. February 24, 2017.

Bud Jordan is not a radical.

He has been an investment broker in Stuart for more than four decades. He's a member of the "business hall of fame" at Florida State University.

He co-founded the Economic Council of Martin County, a pro-business advocacy group, in 1985.

But last month, Jordan resigned in protest from the council he helped create.

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WRLN: House Support Lukewarm For Negron’s Water Plan

WRLN: Written by The News Service of Florida. February 24, 2017. 

It appears doubtful the House will take up, as written, a $2.4 billion proposal by Senate President Joe Negron to buy land south of Lake Okeechobee to ease the impacts of polluted water releases into estuaries on the east and west coasts.

House Government Accountability Chairman Matt Caldwell, R-North Fort Myers, said advancing Negron's proposed 60,000-acre reservoir in the Everglades Agricultural Area — atop what is now farmland — would be "non-starter" if it displaces other projects, such as the $600 million C-43 reservoir along the Caloosahatchee River west of the lake.

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MIAMI HERALD: Florida water managers call for ending federal court oversight of Everglades clean-up

Miami Herald: Written by Jenny Staletovich. February 23, 2017.

A quarter century after the state promised to clean up polluted farm water fouling the Everglades in a historic federal court order, water managers say its time to end the judicial oversight.

In an email earlier this month, an attorney for the South Florida Water Management District asked the U.S. Department of Justice to agree to terminate a “consent order” struck to end a bitter legal battle over dirty water flowing off sugarcane fields and into Everglades National Park and the Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge. The district, which has repeatedly pushed to end the judicial oversight, argues that with water in 90 percent of the Everglades now meeting targets and construction on schedule for clean-up projects, the order is no longer needed.

 


TCPALM: Letter: The southern reservoir is the one solution with the most impact on lake discharge

TCPalm: Written by Letter to the Editor. February 9, 2017. 

As a Florida resident with a real appreciation of our state’s natural beauty, it is hard for me seeing what has again happened to Lake Okeechobee and surrounding waterways. How many times do we need to be plagued with toxic algae outbreaks for something to be done?

Although many claim that there are various solutions out there to solving this problem, there is only one project that truly has the most impact — the Everglades Agricultural Area Reservoir. This southern water storage reservoir would open up a new outlet where we could send the water instead of dumping it east and west. The EAA Reservoir provides that new outlet where water can be sent and stored until it is needed in the Everglades and Florida Bay during the dry season.

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MIAMI HERALD: Sugar growers to state: No sale on our farmland south of Lake Okeechobee

Miami Herald: Written by Mary Ellen Klas. February 6, 2016. 

Sugar-cane growers and other farmers who own some of the largest parcels of land in the Everglades Agricultural Area told the Florida Senate on Monday that they will not willingly sell their land to build a water-holding reservoir south of Lake Okeechobee, setting up a possible standoff in the power struggle over the future of Everglades cleanup.

The owners, which include sugar giants U.S. Sugar and Florida Crystals, said in a letter delivered to the Legislature on Tuesday that they “do not support any governmental acquisition of additional farm lands south of Lake Okeechobee to solve issues that are being caused north of Lake Okeechobee and in Martin County.

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TCPALM: Letter: Right words from Negron; now we need action on flows from Lake O

TCPalm: Written by Letter to the Editor. February 6, 2017.

That was an excellent (Facebook Live) interview Jan. 26 with Sen. Joe Negron. Reporter Isadora Rangel asked most of the major questions — about Amendment 1, how to work together with the sugar farmers and ag interests, how we are all Floridians and should be working to solve the problem, how the Army Corps needs to be reined in and directed to do what's best for all the people on both coasts, as well as the farmers.

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WASHINGTON POST: Secondhand sugars are the new secondhand smoke — and they’re harming children

Washington Post: Written by Michael I. Goran and Emily Ventura. January 27, 2017.

If you saw a pregnant woman smoking, you would undoubtedly be concerned about the health of her child. But if you saw a pregnant woman drinking a soda, would you bat an eye? The comparison may seem extreme, but the parallels between tobacco and sugar run deeper than you might imagine.

There is no debate that secondhand smoke is harmful. Now scientists are discovering similar risks of “secondhand sugars” in infants and children, specifically that our high-sugar environment can harm children’s development and their long-term health.

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WPTV: Water district reveals historic plan to address Lake Okeechobee overflow

WPTV: Written by Alanna Quillen. February 2, 2017.

PALM BEACH COUNTY, Fla.- The fight over where to send the water from Lake Okeechobee, in hopes of preventing another algae crisis like we saw in 2016, took an interesting turn on Thursday with an important development and a possible new option.

Instead of battling over sending the water south, east or west, state water authorities proposed sending the excess water from Lake Okeechobee underground.

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THE IRISH TIMES: The Everglades: River of grass, water of life

The Irish Times: Written by Paddy Woodworth. February 4, 2017. 

“There are no other Everglades in the world,” writes Marjory Stoneman Douglas in the opening of The Everglades: River of Grass, her very readable 1947 study of one of the world’s most fascinating and least understood regions. 

Like so much of her writing, which ranges from the environment to women’s issues and civil rights, she conveys a great deal of information and ideas in a few words. She was at once drawing attention to the Everglades’ unique qualities and implicitly insisting on the importance of conserving it even as she watched it dying before her eyes. 

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NEWS-PRESS: Bradley's bill offers solutions to our water crisis

News-Press: Written by Daniel Andrews. February 3, 2017.

Recently, Florida Sen. Rob Bradley filed a bill to purchase 60,000 acres of land in the Everglades Agricultural Area to construct a dynamic reservoir to alleviate discharges to the Caloosahatchee and St. Lucie rivers, and provide desperately needed water supply to Florida Bay. This essential component of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Project (CERP) has been talked about, and postponed for most of my life, while our estuaries have steadily declined, creeping closer and closer to their tipping point.

The current approach to Everglades restoration by our water managers is not working. CERP was passed 17 years ago, and the estuaries of South Florida are continuing to decline rapidly. I would argue that they’re declining faster now than they were 17 years ago when CERP was passed. Up until this point, the focus of Everglades restoration has been on ancillary projects that do not address the root of the problem- the River of Grass has been dammed and diverted by way of manmade canals to the Caloosahatchee and St. Lucie Rivers. Until we address the root of the problem, our community and economy will continue to suffer.

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