MIAMI HERALD: A pollution alarm for Everglades after Florida’s super wet year, but how bad is it?

Miami Herald: Written by Jenny Staletovich. November 10, 2017. 

Water flowing into Everglades National Park during the wettest rainy season on record, along with a powerful hurricane, exceeded court-ordered limits for marsh-killing phosphorus, the South Florida Water Management District revealed this week.

Scientists on an oversight committee may not determine for months whether a formal legal violation occurred, but the exceedance is an indication of just how deep, and complex, Florida’s water problems have become.

After record rain drenched the state in June, leaving water conservation areas full and Lake Okeechobee high, Hurricane Irma and a tropical storm followed. Florida Bay, which looked like it might be spared the worst after Irma, is now struggling with thick algae in the central bay and elevated amounts in the northeast part. And that’s got recreational boaters and anglers who make up one of the Keys’ biggest economic engines worried.

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