Welcome to Everglades Trust


The Everglades comprise the largest subtropical wetland ecosystem in North America and are recognized as one of the most important on the planet. They are a World Heritage Site and an International Biosphere Reserve.

Home to more than 80 endangered species of plants and animals, they are the source of the water supply for one out of every three Floridians (8 million people). The Everglades are the nexus of our water-based tourism economy, the economics this great system generates and makes possible exceed anything else in Florida.

Along with the Everglades Foundation, the Trust was founded in 1994 by the late George Barley. Today his legacy is carried on by his wife, Mary, and a dedicated Board of Directors, staff and volunteers. Our advocacy is backed up by overwhelming sound science and research. The Everglades Foundation is a world-renowned leader in the science and engineering of the Everglades. The Everglades Trust is the political science of the Everglades. And, unfortunately, there is a whole lot of politics embedded in the Everglades. 

The Trust and all those we partner with insist that local, state and federal lawmakers take meaningful and timely action to preserve and restore America’s Everglades. Through grassroots initiatives and legislator education, the Trust ensures lawmakers are held accountable to their constituents to save and protect the Everglades.


  • Latest from the Everglades Review

    Your voice is needed: Army Corps Public Comment Period

    For decades, Everglades Trust has been on the front lines of Everglades restoration. We've worked to keep the focus on making the EAA Reservoir – the Everglades reservoir and treatment project – a reality. This one project has been a linchpin of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan since its inception in 2000, yet 20 years later our government still doesn’t have it built. Out of 68 projects, this reservoir and treatment component – the Everglades reservoir south of Lake O – was ranked number two. 20 years ago. And as we all know too well, the situation we’re in now is far more dire than it was 20 years ago.  After agreeing to it in 2000, the sugar cartel has fought it at every turn, dragging out the process to their benefit while the Everglades and Florida Bay deteriorate more each year from a lack of freshwater and both coasts of Florida are tortured by toxic, polluted water discharges.   
    read more

    The Elephant in the Everglades

    Recently, the Miami Herald hosted the 2019 Florida Priorities Summit that focused on issues affecting all Floridians – the economy, education, the environment, health care and transportation. The day-long conference of speakers and panel discussions brought together some of Florida's top leaders and decision makers. Oh, and Big Sugar. Moderated by Michael Grunwald, journalist and author of The Swamp, the group convened to discuss the number one issue described by the 50 top thought leaders in the state – our environment – and included Miami Beach Mayor Dan Gelber, Eric Eikenberg of the Everglades Foundation, and Julie Wraithmell of Audubon Florida. Joining these environmental leaders was Gaston Cantens of Florida Crystals, representing the Sugar Cane League. Weird, right?! Turns out, the Sugar Cane League was a sponsor of the event.
    read more
    See all posts

connect